wordfully:

syllababes:

Yes! We finally did it! 
After months of planning and school and… more planning and school, we are finally launching our youtube channel. 
Who are the Syllababes, you might ask - well, we are a group of high school/college students who love linguistics and languages. And we decided to make some videos about it.
So, we are proud to present our first video: The Accent Challenge by firepenguindiscodom
Other Syllababes have already done their challenges which will be uploaded within the next few days :)

Very proud, but also a little scared,
The Syllababes

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Remember like 6 months ago when me and a couple of other tumblinguists were really excited about A THING? Well, here it is! A linguistics/language youtube channel called Syllababes.
But! It’s not only a youtube channel; we also have a tumblr, which will (hopefully) be quite active, a twitter account and a facebook page.

Please follow us on every possible social media thingy, it would mean the world to us. Let’s celebrate!

(via speutschlish)

Australian English - a Handy Guide, part 1

tittily:

my favorite thing about england is that the word pulp doesnt exist 

tittily:

my favorite thing about england is that the word pulp doesnt exist 

(via trashcomrade)

"Your voice sounds completely different in different languages. It alters your personality somehow. I don’t think people get the same feeling from you. The rhythm changes. Because the rhythm of the language is different, it changes your inner rhythm and that changes how you process everything.

When I hear myself speak French, I look at myself differently. Certain aspects will feel closer to the way I feel or the way I am and others won’t. I like that—to tour different sides of yourself. I often find when looking at people who are comfortable in many languages, they’re more comfortable talking about emotional stuff in a certain language or political stuff in another and that’s really interesting, how people relate to those languages."

François Arnaud, for Interview Magazine (via gilbertnorrell)

(Source: iraplastic, via cuimhnigh-i-gconai)

lavidapoliglota:

also, from the Disney Online International page you can find Disney websites in a variety of languages - the main sites are at a child’s language level, which is especially useful for learning at maybe B1/B2 on CEFR

(via penguinswrite)

aglimpseofglamour:

the english major in me is loving this:
“Weird Al” Yankovic - Word Crimes

As a descriptive linguist, trained not to ‘police’ language, don’t know how I feel about this.

(Source: youtube.com)

questions about language.

necromantias:

1: Your native language.
2: Which languages you know.
3: Which languages you are learning, or want to learn.
4: Does anyone in your family speak a language that you don’t?
5: Your favourite language to listen to.
6: Your least favourite language to listen to.
7: Your…

(Source: lingvistikk)

gelasticscholastic:

sqbr:

[A diagram of the consonants collected by their places of articulation within the mouth and larynx]

rattiepuff

gelasticscholastic:

sqbr:

[A diagram of the consonants collected by their places of articulation within the mouth and larynx]

rattiepuff

(Source: horizonediting, via anarkawaii)

holdyourlangue:

amateurlanguager:

selchieproductions:

midnightyen:

THIS JUST BLOWS MY MIND.

Linguistics and Harry Potter are two of my favourite things. 

I didn’t know which blog to put this on. So it’s going on both :]

honestly one of my favourite things.

(via foreignfawn)

linguisten:

marietje-kh:

“The Arabic word تكلم (to speak), has another root meaning كلم which means to wound. How many people have we wounded with our words?”

— (via iibrahim)

There’s a Hawaiian proverb:

I ka ‘olelo no ke ola, i ka ‘olelo no ka make.
'Language can heal, language can destroy.'

(Source: sheikhynotes.blogspot.co.uk, via elreydelmar)